FAQ

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Concierge medicine, or boutique medicine, is all about improving service to my patients. MyMD provides minimal office wait time, 24/7 telephone access to your personal physician, and same or next day scheduling. As a concierge physician, I even make house calls in certain instances. Our practice size is limited so that individualized care and service can be enhanced and ensured. MyMD patients sign a membership agreement and are charged an annual fee for personalized service.
Patients sign a membership agreement and are charged an annual fee which gives them access to MyMD’s concierge medical services. Just call my office and I will be happy to assist you. You can also click here to find additional information on the four membership levels offered at MyMD Personal Medicine.
Personal medicine is just that; personal. Before you join MyMD we will have a one-on-one meeting to discuss your health history, goals and any concerns you may have. Based on that conversation we will decide together which membership level best suits your health needs and your lifestyle. To schedule an interview, please click here.
Yes, on a limited basis. We carefully monitor the size of our concierge practice in order to ensure each patient receives the highest level of personal care. We invite you to call our office for more information.
Under the terms of the Membership Agreement you may elect to pay annually or through a scheduled automatic debit.
Yes, per your insurance agreement and/or the current Medicare rules, co-pays, deductibles, prescriptions and other outside costs are your responsibility.
You deserve continuity of care in and out of the hospital. As your primary care physician, I am mindful of your history, personality and preferences, whether your care takes place at a Critical Care Unit, Medical Ward or office. Hospital privileges mean I have passed a strict peer and formal credentialing process just to be eligible. These privileges give me the ability to coordinate hospital care among specialists and bring a collaborative medical history to all members of the team.
Board Certification means I have passed a nationally recognized qualification exam in this specialty of medicine. It is important to note that not all doctors are Board Certified.
Unlike a general practitioner, this is a specialty of medicine that treats patients 18 years and older throughout their lifetime. As an internist I am involved in coordinating your care among specialists and in providing a unique, comprehensive approach to all your health care issues. While many patients refer to me as their family doctor, I do not deliver babies or treat children, and I do not perform surgery. However, I do perform cardiac risk assessment, exercise stress testing, pulmonary function testing and dermatology procedures as well as deliver preventative health advice.
Internists are often the first to diagnose a health issue and will make a physician referral to the appropriate specialist when the necessary treatment is beyond our scope of expertise. An internal medicine specialist will also serve as your advocate and navigate the complex medical system on your behalf. As someone who knows you personally, it is my responsibility to ensure you receive coordinated, continuity of care from start to finish.
Each and every member of MyMD Personal Concierge Medicine is evaluated individually. As a part of the personal medicine service, we will learn what type of membership will work best for you, a cost is determined by the level of service your require.

FAQ

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A doctor of internal medicine, or “internist” is a specialist trained in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of adults. They are concerned with the overall health and well-being of the adult patient. They generally have three or more years of their medical school and postgraduate training dedicated to understanding prevention, diagnosis and treatment of adult diseases. (Some people confuse a “Doctor of Internal Medicine” or “internist” with a doctor in their first year of residency training called an “intern”.)
The internist uses tools such as history taking, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Their responsibilities often include patient education, prescription of medications, lifestyle modification, and referral to other medical specialists.
Adult diseases addressed by an internist include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and many other medical conditions. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”—as a result of their extensive training, they are often called upon by other physicians to help diagnose difficult medical challenges.
Practicing in Bend, Oregon as an internal medicine physician, Dr. Rich MacDonell provides thorough, compassionate care to keep his patients healthy and active. In addition to treating specific conditions, he provides practical advice and prevention tips to help his patients take a pro-active role in their health, fitness and overall quality of life.
When an internist enters into practice after the completion of their broad training, they are practicing “general internal medicine” and are commonly called “general internists”. As such, they are well-trained to handle the full spectrum of illnesses that affect adults and are recognized as experts in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. They also receive extensive training around the promotion of optimal health and the prevention of disease. Their training is aimed at understanding the body as a whole, not a single disease or organ system. Since adult illness often involves complex diagnostic challenges with multiple contributing factors, the general internist is particularly well-trained to provide diagnosis and care.
Dr. MacDonell has chosen to practice primary care and follow his patients throughout their adult lives. While the comprehensive knowledge of medical history from this relationship is important, perhaps more valuable over time is the caring and compassionate friendship that can emerge as a result.
There are fundamental differences in training, clinical approach and activities between internal medicine and family medicine. While the basic training for both specialties is three years, as noted above, internal medicine focuses only on adults. This training focuses on common general medical conditions, but also includes significant training in subspecialties such as neurology, endocrinology, rheumatology, and infectious diseases. Internal medicine candidates are also required to have clinical experience where they must develop long-term therapeutic relationships with patients. Most training programs also involve caring for hospital patients and intensive/critical care settings.
Family medicine training is generally based in outpatient situations where the trainees provide care for adults and children. They are also required to have some experience with obstetrics, gynecology, surgery and geriatric care. This education tends to be broader in nature than internal medicine, but less comprehensive in the areas related to adult medical issues. This equips the family medicine practitioner with the skills to deal with medical issues in the entire family and in communities where specialists might not be readily available.